The source for this summary is http://theportugalnews.com. Latest update was November 17, 2018.

Fewer people applying for citizenship

In comparison to 2016, last year, 2017, 28.2 percent fewer people applied for Portuguese nationality. Naturalization, followed by “marriage or de facto union with Portuguese citizens for more than three years", and having a child with a Portuguese partner remained the main routes for foreigners who did acquire Portuguese nationality.

This is according to data released this past week by the National Institute of Statistics (INE). According to INE's demographic statistics, the population has been dwindling continually since 2010, although it has subsided in the last four years.

This is according to data released this past week by the National Institute of Statistics (INE). According to INE's demographic statistics, the population has been dwindling continually since 2010, although it has subsided in the last four years.

Total passengers traveling through Lisboa’s airport will surpass 29 million in 2018

In 2017 passenger traffic at Humberto Delgado airport rose by 18.8% year-on-year to a total of 26.7 million passengers. Following his speech at a conference on air navigation in Lisbon, Secretary of State Guilherme W. d'Oliveira Martins projected 29 million passengers will travel through Lisboa’s airport.

Portugal’s fertility rate one of the lowest in the EU

Portugal, according to a new study published in medical journal The Lancet, has an average birth rate of 1.3 children per woman, which is the second lowest birth rate in Europe and one of the lowest in the world. This, the research suggests, is largely due to women prioritizing professional careers as well as easy access to health care. 
Portugal is among a worldwide group of just 91 countries where the average birth rate sits below two children. Within the EU, only Cyprus has a lower birth rate.
The study by the University of Washington, published in The Lancet and reported by Spanish news agency Efe, shows that in the EU, Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Cyprus all have birth rates that fall below the European average of 1.6 children. The two EU countries with the highest fertility are Ireland and France.
Spain has an average of 1.4 children per woman, and Cyprus just one child per woman.
On the other hand, the study shows, Niger is the country where women have most children, at an average of seven. Niger leads the birth list (7.1), followed by Chad (6.7), Somalia (6.1) and Mali (6). Over half of the world’s nations have fertility rates less than the replacement rate.
A number of Portuguese municipalities have in recent years launched initiatives to attract young families to them, which include tax breaks and incentives for those looking to start families.
Portugal has been battling to boost its struggling birth rate and ageing population for almost a decade, having registered negative results since 2009.
Exacerbating this, according to newspaper Jornal de Notícias, is news that Portugal last year lost some 32,000 residents. However, last autumn it did experience something of a ‘baby boom’, for the first time in almost a decade, with over 1,000 babies born in October and November 2017. 

New figures have revealed that workers have seen their wages increase across most pay levels. While civil servants saw their average wages rise to 880 euros, general workers earning under 600 euros dropped by 13 percent.

Workers taking home between 600 and 900 euros rose by around 9 percent, while those clearing up to 1,200 were up by 8 percent. An increase of almost 10 percent was seen by those whose net pay is up to 1,800 euros, while wages of people earning more than that grew by 7 percent.

Home loans granted by Portuguese banks in September totalled €790 million, falling for the third month in a row since the introduction of new rules by the Bank of Portugal (BdP).

According to the central bank’s latest figures on loans and bank deposits, the banks provided home loans worth €790 million, less than the figure of €810 million in August - a month in which they had already retreated on month - but more than the €739 million granted in September 2017.
Since the beginning of the year the banks have lent €7.293 billion in new housing loans compared with €5.951 billion granted last year between January and September.
For new residential loans, the average interest rate remained at 1.36 percent, while for consumer credit and loans for other purposes, the average interest rates were respectively 7.19 percent and 3.84 percent (7.04 percent and 4.07 percent in August).
In July, the new rules of the Bank of Portugal came into force, creating restrictions on granting new home and consumer loans, stating, for example, that households can only spend half of their income on bank loans.